Blog: What’s Happening in Yoga Therapy

Yogic practice for combat veterans: Snapshot of a VA program

By Anne Platt I teach yoga therapy, the therapeutic application of yoga developed specifically to help heal damaged bodies, minds, and spirits. My “students” at the Los Angeles Veterans Administration (VA) include a wide range of veterans, from the Vietnam era all the...

Yoga therapy: A sweet spot in diabetes control

By Robyn Tiger Did you ever stop to wonder how the cells in your body get their energy? Just like you, your cells need food—for them, that comes in the form of a sugar called glucose. Insulin, a hormone released by the pancreas, acts like a key that lets glucose into...

Accessible yoga, yoga therapy, & building a universal practice

Certified yoga therapist Steffany Moonaz, PhD, C-IAYT, discusses the distinctions between yoga therapy and accessible yoga, both of which can help a range of people experience yoga's therapeutic potential: "It is sometimes said that all yoga is therapeutic—and I would...

Yoga therapy comes to the clinic

This beautifully written account explains how the pranayama of "bee breath" is used in one hospital. "Despite feeling dizzy, you listen to [the] teacher’s instructions and you bring your fingers to touch your sense organs. Thumbs gently press on your ears on both...

When your new hip won’t talk to you

Yoga therapy encourages listening deeply to the body—its complaints, requests, wisdom...Fine-tuning the ability to receive these messages, and to integrate their inseparable effects on our mental processes and our experiences, is a skill yoga therapists both teach and...

Top 5 benefits of yoga therapy for cancer care

By Laura Kupperman Ample scientific literature supports the benefits of yoga for cancer care, pointing toward improvements in quality of life, well-being, sleep, strength, and energy. Studies also show diminished anxiety, depression, stress, PTSD symptoms, heart rate,...

The safety of yoga

A friendly reminder: Yoga isn't a workout, and it's definitely not about achieving ever more "advanced" physical postures. If we remember the wide-ranging philosophical basis of the practice, yoga serves us quite well as a therapeutic modality. On the other hand,...

Is it just spit? Yogic breathing may affect salivary proteins

By Sundar Balasubramanian Saliva is a basic fluid found in organisms ranging from insects to humans, and it contains several molecules needed for normal physiological functioning. Environmental factors activate salivation, so saliva is a critical bridge in translating...

A yoga therapy perspective on the human system: The panchamaya model

By Diane Finlayson The yoga philosophy that informs the way yoga therapists view the individual comes from a text called the Taittiriya Upanishad. Its second chapter describes a way of considering the human system that incorporates five interconnected “sheaths”—the...

True Yoga: Practicing with the Yoga Sutras…

By Annette Watson If you're not familiar with the Yoga Sutras, this Sanskrit text is believed to have been written more than 2,000 years ago by the sage Patanjali, who collected 196 short verses that could be learned and lived. Sutra translates as “thread” or...