Blog Submission Guidelines

Thank you for your interest in contributing to yogatherapy.health!

This is IAYT’s public-facing site that shares information about yoga therapy. We post blog articles weekly and feature many of these articles in the site’s monthly newsletter. 

General Guidelines

  • Keep article length between 500 and 750 words.
  • All submissions must be original. We do not accept articles published previously on other platforms, including an author’s personal website.
  • Please send your submission in a Word or Pages document or shared as a Google Doc link. For Google Doc links, be sure that “anyone with this link can view ” to ensure the editor is able to open the link. Submissions in PDF cannot be accepted.
  • Support any scientific claims with source references (e.g., a primary research article) or state that the information comes from your observation, a conversation or email with a peer or teacher, and so on.
  • We change names to protect privacy when it comes to sharing client stories or quotes.
  • Please include a bio (~30 words) after the body of the piece. We will hyperlink your name to your website if you provide the link. 
  • If there are images that go along with your post (e.g., yoga poses), please include them at the end of your submission document. Only include images to which you have the rights or permission to use.

The Editorial Process

Upon submission, the editor will copy and paste your article into a new Google Doc. The editorial process takes place in this space. Submissions are subject to developmental editing and copy editing. At least one revision is usually required from an author, and we intend to make the refinement of the piece a collaborative effort between editor and author.

Most articles have 1–2 images, which are chosen by the editor (unless specific images relating to the article’s content are shared by the author). The blog adheres to a number of themes and guidelines, which makes image selection a more involved process than one might think! Therefore final image selection is determined by the editor. 

A Note on Content

Please keep in mind that our audience is seeking content that will foster a deeper understanding of yoga therapy and how it can support health and well-being. Our blog authors are IAYT members and, oftentimes, IAYT-certified yoga therapists who are excited about their work in the field of yoga therapy. While we encourage this enthusiasm to come through in your writing, we do not publish promotional pieces that center around an author’s book, product, or personal brand. We do publish the occasional media review—but these reviews are written by someone other than the author themself. If parts of your personal or professional background are pertinent to the article itself, it is possible to weave these in skillfully.

Here are a few examples of how authors do this:

Why Restorative Yoga may not be what you want—but could be what you need

Integrating yoga therapy with conventional cancer care in hospital settings

Yoga therapy for youth with autism

Why yoga therapy can support LGBTQIA+ embodiment and well-being